The new Mazda CX-30 compact SUV was unveiled today at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.

Slotting into the range between the CX-3 and CX-5, the new CX-30 is 4,395 mm long, 1,795 mm wide and 1,540 mm high, with a 2,655 mm wheelbase.

The styling follows an evolution of the company’s Kodo design language, one Mazda’s designers refer to as ‘Charge and Release’ which relates to the brushwork in Japanese calligraphy.

In the CX-30, this manifests itself as a strong shoulder line that flows from above the rear wheel over the front wing, and the way reflections form on the body beneath this line in an S-shape.

Compared to the CX-3, the CX-30 wears chunkier and more prominent black cladding, while the front end design is perhaps more reminiscent of the new CX-5.

Notably, however, the front indicators are mounted much lower – just above the black cladding – and operate in a series of sequential fading pulses.

The cabin features a wider floor console that brings the controls closer to the driver, while the dashboard is topped in a wing-shaped hood finished with contrasting stitching.

A choice of colour schemes is offered: Black or Pure White leather upholstery with dark brown accents, and Greige or Black fabric or leatherette upholstery with dark blue accents.

Mazda’s MZD Connect infotainment system gains an updated interface and 8.8-inch wide-screen display, and now supports both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

Luggage capacity is 430 litres with the rear seats in place while a power tailgate is available as an option.

Engine choices will include conventional petrol and diesel engines, plus Mazda’s new Skyactiv-X spark controlled compression ignition engine.

The line-up will also include petrol engines equipped with Mazda’s new M-Hybrid 24V mild-hybrid system backed by a 600kJ lithium-ion battery.

The company’s i-Activ AWD and G-Vectoring Control Plus systems will also be available, as will the various i-Activsense safety features.

The new Mazda CX-30 will go on sale in the UK later this year.

Alex

Editor

Freelance journalist, ex-offroad driving instructor and long distance road-tripper. If you have any questions about this piece, feel free to drop me a line on Twitter.